• MFA in Fine Arts

  • Andrea Gonzalez
    Byron Peters
    Jacob Wick
    Jaimie Healy
    Jordan Reznick
    Jsun Charles-Jeremiah Parizo
    Julia Robertson
    Julie Feldman
    Kenny Kong
    Nan Peletz
    Sadie Harmon
    Sara Sellitto
    Seth Gutierrez
    Tiffany Canter
    Tim Power
    Zoe McCloskey

  • Abigail Clark - CCA Graduate Thesis Events

    Abigail Clark

    The Rovers
    The Rovers (detail)
    Portrait of a Lightning Bolt
    Portrait of a Lightning Bolt (detail)
    Black Room
    Black Room
    Moon Drawing
    Moon Drawing
    Vantage Points
    Vantage Points (detail)

    The Rovers

    10' x 10'

    Installation, 2013

    The Rovers (detail)

    10 x 10'

    10rpm motor, armature wire, charcoal dust, sewing needle, 2013

    Portrait of a Lightning Bolt

    3' x 25' x 5'

    Charcoal on paper, 2012

    Portrait of a Lightning Bolt (detail)

    3' x 25' x 5'

    Charcoal on paper, 2012

    Black Room

    10' x 8' x 6'

    A small room, tin foil, LED lights, 2012 - *This installation takes place in a small room, which appears pitch black for approx. 3 minutes

    Black Room

    10' x 8' x 6'

    A small room, tin foil, LED lights, 2012

    Moon Drawing

    6' x 8' x 3'

    Charcoal, graphite, latex paint, 2012

    Moon Drawing

    6' x 8 x 3'

    Charcoal, graphite, latex paint, 2012

    Vantage Points

    13' x 12' 10'

    Fishing line, clay, 2012 - * Originally installed at the For-Site Foundation

    Vantage Points (detail)

    13' x 12' x 10'

    Fishing line, Clay, 2012

    The Rovers thumbnail
    The Rovers (detail) thumbnail
    Portrait of a Lightning Bolt thumbnail
    Portrait of a Lightning Bolt (detail) thumbnail
    Black Room thumbnail
    Black Room thumbnail
    Moon Drawing thumbnail
    Moon Drawing thumbnail
    Vantage Points thumbnail
    Vantage Points (detail) thumbnail

    abigailclark44@gmail.com
    abagail-clark.com

    Artist Statement

    Southern Nantahala Wilderness, 2006:

    I left the campfire. I had to walk back to my tent, which was just a quarter mile up the trail. The darkness was thick, impenetrable. My eyes were open but I couldn’t see. I kept walking, feeling as though I would trip over a rock or a branch at any second. I carved my way through the blackness.

    Slowly my eyes began to adjust. Patches of moonlight on the ground appeared, and then tree silhouettes with their skinny arms raised high.
    Dimness. I stood there bundled in my many layers of sweaters, looking at the soft light surrounding me. Everything seemed to reflect the sky. Nighttime had a special type of luminosity. The fallen leaves on the ground glowed faintly, revealing a sheen that the moonlight was gentle enough to make visible. I wanted to soak in the light, to somehow experience it more wholeheartedly. To acknowledge it as the sun’s reflections on the earth made me aware of my true location in space.

    This was a simple but potent moment – a reminder that I am a part of a larger natural system. I want to explore what it’s like to be in nature, and the way it can affect us psychologically. How does it feel to be in a specific location in the universe? How can we understand the feeling of awe or wonder that is generated by nature? Science alone cannot answer those questions, but art can make an attempt to. I seek to find an understanding of myself in the surrounding natural world, even though I know that there are no definitive answer