• MFA in Fine Arts

  • Andrea Gonzalez
    Byron Peters
    Jacob Wick
    Jaimie Healy
    Jordan Reznick
    Jsun Charles-Jeremiah Parizo
    Julia Robertson
    Julie Feldman
    Kenny Kong
    Nan Peletz
    Sadie Harmon
    Sara Sellitto
    Seth Gutierrez
    Tiffany Canter
    Tim Power
    Zoe McCloskey

  • Diana Stapleton - CCA Graduate Thesis Events

    Diana Stapleton

    Let It Shine

    0:54

    The New You

    1:09

    Replay:Resaved

    0:39

    http://youtu.be/osffOdb5Z6Y

    Shipwrecked

    1:10

    http://youtu.be/uu47c68LwL0

    Swim

    0:47

    Return

    1:43

    The World Before You

    1:40

    Hug Collector

    2:01

    DFW to SFO

    1:06

    Let It Shine thumbnail
    The New You thumbnail
    Replay:Resaved thumbnail
    Shipwrecked thumbnail
    Swim thumbnail
    Return thumbnail
    The World Before You thumbnail
    Hug Collector thumbnail
    DFW to SFO thumbnail

    dianastapleton1@netzero.com

    dianastapleton.com

    Artist Statement

    My investigation is into expressions of intimacy and alienation as they relate to physical touch, and how these manifest in visual representation. I explore the way that visual and social innovations in technology support or undermine social praxis and personal agency.
    Touch is largely the domain of family members and lovers. Other opportunities for touch are governed by explicit rules, implicit social pressures, or operate in the realms of medicine and commerce. Companionship and contact are fundamental aspects of life and are powerful driving forces for engagement. With technological innovation, vision becomes a surrogate for presence and touch. I examine how desire and longing are engaged and amplified by technology and how disembodiment influences the capacity to act against physical and social alienation.
    Home movies are relational and familiar as a formula, and they reiterate a specific cultural ideology constructed around the hetero-normative nuclear family as an almost exclusive source for connection and bonding. Currently video is used as a mimetic form of reality, with contingent degrees of intimacy, desire and alienation involved. This footage becomes the vernacular of the culture, manifested through its self-represented and completely self-conscious lens. The actors frequently and regularly acknowledge the camera by enthusiastically waving to the future – to this record of themselves and to those who will eventually bear witness.