• MFA in Fine Arts

  • Andrea Gonzalez
    Byron Peters
    Jacob Wick
    Jaimie Healy
    Jordan Reznick
    Jsun Charles-Jeremiah Parizo
    Julia Robertson
    Julie Feldman
    Kenny Kong
    Nan Peletz
    Sadie Harmon
    Sara Sellitto
    Seth Gutierrez
    Tiffany Canter
    Tim Power
    Zoe McCloskey

  • Regina Acebo - CCA Graduate Thesis Events

    Regina Acebo

    There is No Place (Like)
    There is No Place (Like)
    There is No Place (Like)
    Never Again, Again, Again
    Navigating Polly, Ponies, and Permutations in Pink
    Squash the Dominant Paradigm
    Food is the Entry Point

    There is No Place (Like)

    60 1/2" x 38 1/2" x 54 1/2"

    Moving Boxes, Screen print, 2013

    There is No Place (Like)

    60 1/2" x 38 1/2" x 54 1/2"

    Moving Boxes, Screen print, 2013

    There is No Place (Like)

    8 1/2" x 11"

    Photograph, 2012

    Never Again, Again, Again

    3 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 24"

    Archival paper polygon pop-up, 2012

    Navigating Polly, Ponies, and Permutations in Pink

    Figure 13" x 40” Figure, Vertical Boards 12”x12”, Horizontal Board 16” x 10”

    Cardboard, Screen print, Children's Toys, 2012

    Squash the Dominant Paradigm

    48" x 60"

    Found paper ephemera, photographs, Birch board, 2012

    Food is the Entry Point

    Packaged food, Shipping Box, Filipino Narra bowl and woven fabric, archived digital story

    36” x 54”, 2012

    There is No Place (Like)   thumbnail
    There is No Place (Like)   thumbnail
    There is No Place (Like) thumbnail
    Never Again, Again, Again thumbnail
    Navigating Polly, Ponies, and Permutations in Pink thumbnail
    Squash the Dominant Paradigm thumbnail
    Food is the Entry Point thumbnail

    ginaacebo5@gmail.com

    Artist Statement

    In a time of global upheaval, my art practice is fueled by my experiences as a community organizer and my observations on how issues and historical events serve as thresholds for public engagement. Combining customary organizing tools like one on one contact, interviews, and social networking, with photography, sculpture, and printmaking, I build installations to explore how people navigate public and private spheres of society.

    My interest in using paper-based materials comes out of my childhood fascination with dioramas and pop-up forms. As a child, creating dioramas was my way of constructing imaginary worlds through the arrangement of objects, images, sound, and stories. In terms of pop-ups, books are usually the vehicles of choice, so it’s not unusual for a person to associate the act of storytelling with the form. Pop-ups offer a satisfying experience of being able to look and touch the work. At first glance, a pop-up demonstrates a whimsical quality, producing instantaneous visual magic tricks that utilize shape, color, kinetics, scale, and the element of surprise. I use its playful qualities as a tactic to catch the viewer off guard and to investigate ideas and issues rife with cultural assumptions or coded language.

    Using every day materials like paper and cardboard combined with found ephemera and readymade objects, my making leverages storytelling, political analysis, and humor as a cultural strategy for public discourse amongst diverse audiences.