• MFA in Fine Arts

  • Andrea Gonzalez
    Byron Peters
    Jacob Wick
    Jaimie Healy
    Jordan Reznick
    Jsun Charles-Jeremiah Parizo
    Julia Robertson
    Julie Feldman
    Kenny Kong
    Nan Peletz
    Sadie Harmon
    Sara Sellitto
    Seth Gutierrez
    Tiffany Canter
    Tim Power
    Zoe McCloskey

  • Sara Dykstra - CCA Graduate Thesis Events

    Sara Dykstra

    Pink Portrait 1a & 1b
    C.C.
    (dis)-Integration 1
    (dis)-Integration 7
    (dis)-Integration 4, 5 & 6
    Excavation of Body in Bedroom
    Room with Screen
    Mirror with Steam
    Mirror with Steam 2
    View from the Palette

    Pink Portrait 1a & 1b

    19” x 28”

    Oil on Mylar and Paper, 2012

    C.C.

    60” x 24”

    Oil on Paper, 2011

    (dis)-Integration 1

    20” x 20”

    Oil and Aluminum Leaf on Canvas, 2012

    (dis)-Integration 7

    20” x 20”

    Oil and Aluminum Leaf on Canvas, 2012

    (dis)-Integration 4, 5 & 6

    20" x 60" (20” x 20” each)

    Oil and Aluminum Leaf on Canvas, 2012

    Excavation of Body in Bedroom

    60" x 96"

    Oil and Aluminum Leaf on Canvas, 2012

    Room with Screen

    30" x 30"

    Oil on Canvas, 2013

    Mirror with Steam

    16" x 16"

    Oil on Linen, 2012

    Mirror with Steam 2

    16" x 16"

    Oil on Linen, 2012

    View from the Palette

    12" x 12"

    Oil on Wood

    Pink Portrait 1a & 1b thumbnail
    C.C. thumbnail
    (dis)-Integration 1 thumbnail
    (dis)-Integration 7 thumbnail
    (dis)-Integration 4, 5 & 6 thumbnail
    Excavation of Body in Bedroom thumbnail
    Room with Screen thumbnail
    Mirror with Steam thumbnail
    Mirror with Steam 2 thumbnail
    View from the Palette thumbnail

    sedykstra@gmail.com
    www.saradykstra.com

    Artist Statement

    My practice stems from a desire to understand and to be close to my subjects. Working from direct observation or photographs, I paint one or two people repeatedly for several months at a time. I also work from still life objects that are distinct representations of people or memories from my life.

    In composing a painting, I consider how much information is necessary to illuminate the essence of the subject. By essence, I mean the things that are vital to the existence of someone or something and secondly, a presence; the physical and psychic sensation of the presence of someone or something that cannot be put into words, but perhaps can be found in painting. I veil areas in order to reveal others and exclude information in order to expose the underlying layers of the surface. I build translucent fabric windows — barriers to look through when I paint my sitters from life, and fabric canopies that shroud and conceal my still life objects. The use of the veil creates the illusion of an image that is suspended; both emerging and receding in space. Painting the physical barrier between myself and the subject reflects an on-going desire to uncover what lays beneath.  

    My painting practice is about relishing in uncertainty and living in a world with a paucity of answers. It is not about certainty or finality, rather it is the mystery itself, the tiny clues that keep me curious and the seduction of it all.