• MFA in Fine Arts

  • Andrea Gonzalez
    Byron Peters
    Jacob Wick
    Jaimie Healy
    Jordan Reznick
    Jsun Charles-Jeremiah Parizo
    Julia Robertson
    Julie Feldman
    Kenny Kong
    Nan Peletz
    Sadie Harmon
    Sara Sellitto
    Seth Gutierrez
    Tiffany Canter
    Tim Power
    Zoe McCloskey

  • Tali Weinberg - CCA Graduate Thesis Events

    Tali Weinberg

    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Red
    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Yellow-Gold
    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Blue
    0.01% Vacant Potential Homes
    detail: 0.01% of Vacant Potential Homes
    Relief Map
    Thought Patterns, Undulating Twill
    Thought Patterns, Broken Point Twill

    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Red

    27 in x 38 in

    Handwoven Jacquard cloth, threads unraveled from a pillowcase and yarn waste from weaving a blanket (handwoven silk dyed with cochineal and madder root)

    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Yellow-Gold

    28 in x 51 in

    Handwoven Jacquard cloth, threads unraveled from a tablecloth (handwoven linen and organic cotton dyed with weld and osage orange)

    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Blue

    27 in x 41 in

    Handwoven Jacquard cloth, threads leftover from weaving the chupah (wedding canopy) of a close friend (silk dyed with indigo)

    0.01% Vacant Potential Homes

    4 bolts of paper each 36 in x 15 ft

    191,401 vacant potential homes in the US, paper

    detail: 0.01% of Vacant Potential Homes

    Relief Map

    40 in x 40 in

    Organza, unraveled textiles, 35,551 vacant buildings and 2,489 vacant lots across New York’s five boroughs with the potential to house 199,981 people, as mapped by Grassroots organization Picture the Homeless (PTH) in their report “Banking on Vacancy: Homelessness and Real Estate Speculation” with the work of 295 volunteers and 1,475 hours of walking through the city

    Thought Patterns, Undulating Twill

    Digital print on paper 36 in x 36 in

    What from a distance are seemingly abstract, shaded pattern, are actually a repetition of words shifting across the page, creating the illusions of an image and alluding in turn to a textile. In Thought Patterns, a series of digital prints on paper, I draw on a history of textiles as text, from the Incan khipu, a Quechua language of knots, to the Greek myths and Latin fables that stake weaving as the subversive, communicative work of women.

    Thought Patterns, Broken Point Twill

    Digital print on paper 36 in x 36 in

    What from a distance are seemingly abstract, shaded pattern, are actually a repetition of words shifting across the page, creating the illusions of an image and alluding in turn to a textile. In Thought Patterns, a series of digital prints on paper, I draw on a history of textiles as text, from the Incan khipu, a Quechua language of knots, to the Greek myths and Latin fables that stake weaving as the subversive, communicative work of women.

    Undoing

    Video, handwoven jacquard cloth, cotton, and quotation from Disposable Women and Other Myths of Global Capitalism: an ethnography by feminist geographer Melissa Wright, 2006

    Feminist geographer Melisa Wright writes of the “myth of the disposable third world woman… who, through the passage of time, comes to personify the meaning of human disposability… [even as] she simultaneously produces many valuable things with her labor.” But this myth of patriarchal capitalism is an act of laborious and violent erasure, not an inherent truth. Undoing is a video of my hands weaving this paragraph from Wright’s ethnography. A viewer encounters the video on a monitor the width of the loom on which the cloth was woven, placed horizontally on a pedestal the height of the loom. From where the viewer stands, looking down, her hands and eyes could be mine at work. But what is experienced is not the cloth being woven, but unwoven. The video is playing in reverse. I want to do the work of undoing this myth. But instead I produce it in another form. The woven cloth hangs above the monitor, clearly materialized despite its attempted deconstruction.

    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Red thumbnail
    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Yellow-Gold thumbnail
    Entry from An Encyclopedia of Embodied Politics: Blue thumbnail
    0.01% Vacant Potential Homes thumbnail
    detail: 0.01% of Vacant Potential Homes  thumbnail
    Relief Map thumbnail
    Thought Patterns, Undulating Twill thumbnail
    Thought Patterns, Broken Point Twill thumbnail
    Undoing thumbnail

    tali.weinberg@gmail.com

    www.taliweinberg.com

    Artist Statement

    I fuse the languages of text and textiles to investigate the politics of gender, labor, home, and economy. I start from the premise that textiles—as structures, systems of knowledge, and material culture—are inherently social. They are physical and psychological, material and metaphoric, temporal and geographic links between weighty histories of social change and our lives, as experienced in our homes and on our bodies. Textiles link my body to the bodies of others and link our corporeal bodies to social, economic, and political bodies.

    I create installations and artist books that simultaneously references personal experience and social struggle, drawing on the fundamental materiality of textiles to transform human urgencies—the housing crisis, violence against women, and labor exploitation—into tactile, tangible objects. These works are generated through intensive research and data collection that is material, interpersonal, historical, and theoretical.