• MFA in Fine Arts

  • Andrea Gonzalez
    Byron Peters
    Jacob Wick
    Jaimie Healy
    Jordan Reznick
    Jsun Charles-Jeremiah Parizo
    Julia Robertson
    Julie Feldman
    Kenny Kong
    Nan Peletz
    Sadie Harmon
    Sara Sellitto
    Seth Gutierrez
    Tiffany Canter
    Tim Power
    Zoe McCloskey

  • Yan Yan Mao - CCA Graduate Thesis Events

    Yan Yan Mao

    Ding Cube
    Untitled (vessel bronze)
    Yi #1
    Yi #1 to #5
    Assorted Shapes
    Ding Shapes
    Photography Experiment: Studio Record (Overlay, morning position 1, 1-93)
    Photography Experiments: Cut Family Photos
    Photography Experiments: Objects - Apple and Map Cowrie Shell
    Photography Experiments: Object – Rock from Hooper Courtyard (scale model)

    Ding Cube

    2011, 3D printed nylon, 0.787” x 0.984” x 0.787”

    I decided to use 3D printing because I wanted my versions of the vessels to reflect the latest technology, since bronze casting was cutting-edge technology at the time the original vessels were made, several millennia BCE.

    Untitled (vessel bronze)

    2011, Bronz,e 3.5" x 3.5" x 5"

    Based on Ding Cube.

    Yi #1

    2012, Plush fabric, foam padding, 3.5" x 3.5" x 5.5"

    Yi #1 to #5

    2012, Plush fabric, foam padding, handheld size

    The fabric vessels came about as a reaction to the bronze vessel I made. By making the vessels with soft plushy fabrics and at a handheld size, it inverted the cold and distance relationship that viewers have with these ancient vessels when they are on display at museums. The viewers are able to handle and play with the fabric vessels, which enable audiences to have a more personal relationship with the objects.

    Assorted Shapes

    2012, 3D printed nylon, black acrylic, 6” x 6” x 12”

    Having a variety of different vessels is important because the vessels represent more a system of beliefs rather than individual aestheticized objects. The printed vessels are never shown individually, they are always shown in a group. I design shelves that conformed to sets of vessels, rather than having vessels simply placed on standard shelves.

    Ding Shapes

    2012, Digital Print on Luster Photo Paper, 43" x 55.5"

    The photographic print of the vessels can exist on its own. There is a sense of mystery to the print because it is difficult to tell the scale of the objects, even though it is obvious that what is depicted is not the actual size, and to tell what the objects are.

    Photography Experiment: Studio Record (Overlay, morning position 1, 1-93)

    2012, Digital Print on Luster Photo Paper, 24" x 36"

    By taking photographs of my studio over time, I can track the passage of time and the progress of my projects. This will be a visual recording of my practice, which complements the numerical data that I keep for my projects.

    Photography Experiments: Cut Family Photos

    2012, Photographs, tape, cut from 4" x 6" photographs

    By layering photographs, I can add another of dimension of information, which in this case is time. I found, scanned, and ordered reprints of family photographs. I hand cut the numbers of photographs that corresponded with the person’s age in the photograph. Then they were taped together in a stack with double-sided tape.

    Photography Experiments: Objects - Apple and Map Cowrie Shell

    2012, Digital Print on Luster Photo Paper, Apple 12" x 43", Shell 10" x 44"

    By taking photographs of an object as it rotates and then combining slices of the photographs, I can see the entire object at once. By enlarging the photograph, I can see details that my eye cannot see on its own. This method will enable a certain presence of objects that is not available to my naked eyes.

    Photography Experiments: Object – Rock from Hooper Courtyard (scale model)

    2013, Digital Print on Luster Photo Paper, Wall: 2’ x 2’ x 2’, Print: 10.75” x 67.25”

    Ding Cube  thumbnail
    Untitled (vessel bronze) thumbnail
    Yi #1 thumbnail
    Yi #1 to #5 thumbnail
    Assorted Shapes thumbnail
    Ding Shapes thumbnail
    Photography Experiment: Studio Record (Overlay, morning position 1, 1-93) thumbnail
    Photography Experiments: Cut Family Photos thumbnail
    Photography Experiments: Objects - Apple and Map Cowrie Shell thumbnail
    Photography Experiments: Object – Rock from Hooper Courtyard (scale model) thumbnail

    yanyanmao@post.harvard.edu

    ysquaredm.com/

    Artist Statement

    I use the camera as a tool to explore a variety of presences of objects that is not achievable with the naked eye. I am interested in ways to represent our physical world through exploring interactions between photography and sculpture. The translation of 3D reality to 2D images, and then to 2D or 3D objects combines my photographic and sculptural practices. I wish to encourage viewers to look closer at the details of reality.

    The other path in my work, which sometimes intersects with my photographic interests, draws inspiration from my Chinese cultural background. My current fascination is with ritual bronze vessels. They seem to embody a system of beliefs that we no longer have access to today. I am transforming these historical objects into personal objects, and because they were made by my hands, I want to embed them with my belief system.

    The themes of time and labor are prevalent in my projects. All my works are time and labor intensive and I derive great satisfaction from the act of making. Part of the rationale behind this comes from my undergraduate days of simultaneously learning science, working in research labs, and making art. Throughout the artmaking, I would carefully document my works in progress and make prototypes, which I consider experiments, for the final artworks. Since I employ the general structure of the scientific method in my practice, I am currently organizing my ideas and writing about my art in the format of scientific papers.